All the latest UK technology news, reviews and analysis


Google hiring crack team to tackle privacy issues

23 Aug 2012
google logo headquarters sign search engine seo

Google has begun hiring for a crack team of data experts to help resolve privacy complaints, following the $22.5m fine it had to pay the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) after issues relating to the Safari browser.

News that the search giant is recruiting a new privacy division codenamed "red team" broke on Wednesday when Google posted a job advert looking for data engineers.

"As a data privacy engineer at Google you will help ensure that our products are designed to the highest standards and are operated in a manner that protects the privacy of our users," read the job post.

"Specifically, you will work as a member of our Privacy Red Team to independently identify, research and help resolve potential privacy risks across all of our products, services and business processes in place today."

At the time of publishing Google had not responded to V3's request for comment on its new Red Team.

Nevertheless, it suggests the firm is aware of its requirement to be more proactive in dealing with potential security issues as it has been blighted by several high-profile cases in recent years.

The firm is currently embroiled in numerous cases relating to its Street View service after it was found to have gather public Wi-Fi information, and has also failed to delete the data it promised to destroy.

Google also greed to pay a $22.5m fine to settle charges that the company misled users about the company's use of behaviour-tracking cookies in August.

The fine was issued by the FTC, which claimed Safari web browser users were served with cookies when visiting Google sites, circumventing the browser's privacy settings.

"The record setting penalty in this matter sends a clear message to all companies under an FTC privacy order," said FTC chairman Jon Leibowitz at the time.

"No matter how big or small, all companies must abide by FTC orders against them and keep their privacy promises to consumers, or they will end up paying many times what it would have cost to comply in the first place."

  • Comment  
  • Tweet  
  • Google plus  
  • Facebook  
  • LinkedIn  
  • Stumble Upon  
Alastair Stevenson
About

Alastair has worked as a reporter covering security and mobile issues at V3 since March 2012. Before entering the field of journalism Alastair had worked in numerous industries as both a freelance copy writer and artist.

View Alastair's Google+ profile

More on Privacy
What do you think?
blog comments powered by Disqus
Poll

Windows 7 end of mainstream support

What are your plans for when Microsoft ends mainstream support for Windows 7 in January 2015?
14%
14%
0%
65%
7%

Popular Threads

Powered by Disqus
LG G3 in gold black and white

LG G3 vs Galaxy S5 video

We pit the two Korean firms' flagship smartphones against each other

Updating your subscription status Loading
Newsletters

Get the latest news (daily or weekly) direct to your inbox with V3 newsletters.

newsletter sign-up button
hpv3may

Getting started with virtualisation

Virtualisation can help you reduce costs, improve application availability, and simplify IT
management. However, getting started can be challenging

ibmv3may

Converting big data and analytics insights into results

Successful leaders are infusing analytics throughout their organisations to drive smarter decisions, enable faster actions and optimise outcomes

Senior ETL Developer

Our financial services client based in Glasgow is looking...

Customer-facing Junior Software Analyst - Nottingham - £20k

One of Nottingham's fastest-growing Software Houses have...

SENIOR CRM MANAGING CONSULTANT-60K + BENEFITS & LOCATION CHOICE

SENIOR CRM MANAGING CONSULTANT REQUIRED 60K + BENEFITS...

Control & Governance Manager - Financial Services

Control & Governance Manager - (Governance/Control...
To send to more than one email address, simply separate each address with a comma.